30+ years of

COOPERATION & COMMUNITY

THE KLAWOCK COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION

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Live Here. Work Here. Grow. Together.

2021 PORTRAIT AWARD

Win 1 Round Trip Ticket And Exposure

We are offering a free round trip ticket to the winner of a photo contest for our front page background. Submit below for more information. 

Flight

"Love is at the center of our tribe. We RISE by lifting our community. We believe being of service is what makes us human and what makes us beautiful. It's what makes us strong, resilient and compels us to do the right thing."

-Klawock Cooperative Association

Klawock Map of Alaska

Our Story

As a Federally-Recognized Tribe, Klawock Cooperative Association exists to serve, support, and powerfully advocate for our members and place in the surrounding community. We are dedicated to serving the needs of our members and community throughout Klawock, Prince of Wales Island, and the State through daily contribution to individual and community wellbeing. As a leading tribal organization, we take pride in offering the most exemplary support and services. It's time to restore HOPE.

Tlingit Tribe Members

Our Past

Klawock's first settlers were Tlingit, who came from the northern winter village of Tuxekan. They used it as a fishing camp for the summer period and called it by several different names: Klawerak, Tlevak, Clevak, and Klawock.

Klawock Elders in Dress

Our People

Notable Klawock residents include Frank Peratrovich, who served as mayor of Klawock and later president of the ANB, the only Alaska Native of the 55 delegates to the Alaska Constitutional Convention in 1955. Elizabeth Peratrovich lived in Klawock with her husband Roy, elected Mayor four times during the 1930s and '40s.

She served as president of the Alaska Native Sisterhood (ANS) and worked tirelessly in the 1940s on anti-discrimination legislation. She is credited with gaining senate approval in 1945 due to her passionate testimony about the effects of discrimination. The state has recognized her contribution, naming February 16 and Gallery B of the State Capitol in her honor.

Totem Pole

"A tribe is a group of people connected to one another, connected to a leader, and connected to an idea. Our vision comes down to two words: HOPE more."